Below is a list of all accepted works in the 2019 Chattahoochee Handweavers Guild Biennial of Textiles Exhibit, with artist’s names and sale prices. The works are listed alphabetically by the artist’s last name.

Karen Donde

Mary Meigs Atwater Meets Frank Lloyd Wright Shawl Handwoven, 28”x18”, 2018
$500

Variation on a Mary Meigs Atwater pattern called Missouri Check took on a Frank Lloyd Wright look while weaving alternating pattern block arrangements in two colors. Materials: Cotton, tussah silk, viscose, rayon from bamboo, Modal Technique: Handwoven in turned extended summer & winter.

Karen Donde

Broken Sunrise
Handwoven, Beiderwand Cotton, 60”x13.5”, 2018
$800

A Smoky Mountain sunrise that fills the sky with brilliant red when weather conditions are just right—but far from perfect—inspired the design and colors.

Natalie Drummond

Autumn Vest
Handwoven, 36”x24” 2018
NFS

The autumn vest is woven with 4 different hand-dyed yarns (commercial) and lined with navy silk. The weaving draft was modified from various commercial drafts and uses supplemental warps of ribbon yarn as well as broken twill and plain weave.

Rebecca Duex

Polaroid Portrait Handwoven
Theo Moorman technique, 12”x17”, 2018
$380

Fiber is a naturally absorptive medium and thus perfect for capturing sensations: from memory, the present moment, and the imagination. It is a tool for telling stories whether nostalgic or novel and it is my own personal journal. Through fiber, I explore the balance between collaboration and isolation and my own seemingly contradictory social and reclusive natures. Color is one of nature’s great gifts and an important tool in my storytelling. Saturated colors speak boldly to the viewer, while softer shades whisper. The interplay between the two creates a conversation that can be seen and understood – just like words on a page. Creating textiles allows me to record my own experiences and keep a tactile and visual diary. Hopefully the people who come into contact with my textiles feel the joy in their creation and can connect to them and the stories that inspire them.

Geri Forkner

Color Weaving #3
Fiber, 14”x17.5”, 2019
$250

Experiments with weaving the base cloths for nuno felting allow me to push the limits of the density of woven cloth that will laminate to the wool fibers while using color with abandon. The way the warp and weft distort is always a pleasant surprise. The interplay between the colors of the wool base and the weaving always add another dimension to the work. The warp and weft seem to wiggle and dance and beg to be stitched on.

Paula Gron

Bearded Iris
3-D art quilt, 17”x17”x7”, 2018
$1000

I am interested in beauty from decay through the pods and seeds of nature. The forms of these life-giving seeds and the pods they come from, are fascinating in complexity and always give me inspiration for unusual dimensional construction. Using unusual color combinations helps bring attention to form and detail. These vibrant colors help to literally bring my forms back to
life! I do not aim to duplicate nature but to celebrate it’s beauty.

Michele Hardy

Surfaces #26
Mixed fiber, 24”x 24”, 2018
$1400

Surfaces are inspired by the colors, textures, and structures found in nature. The combination of organic lines along with the structures of the grids is inspired by maps, aerial views, macro and microscopic natural features, to create an abstract landscape. The relationship between the colors and shapes is an important part of my imagery, incorporating vibrant color and areas of intricate stitched detail. The choice of color is an important energy in my images since how we view the world often depends on how we color our own personal worlds.

Linda Jarrett 

Rainbow Vest
Handwoven, 17”x17”, cotton, 2019
$175

The rainbow vest was handwoven from a rainbow warp from Blazing Shuttles. I love working with very bright colors.

Carson Keller

Autism Mom Attempts Communication
Appliqued and Quilted Fabric, 27” x 41.5”, 2019
$300

Color excites me, and I think it is a crucial tool in story-telling. In this quilted piece, “Autism Mom Attempts Communication,” I split it down the middle with two separate panels of color to represent the differences between the two. My side, the mom’s side, is a frenetic, dotted yellow panel to represent a mother’s anxieties. My son’s side is black and white, clearly patterned because he is a literal thinker. Color gives immediate clues to the meaning of a piece of art. It’s also global language that’s especially helpful in visual communication tools for those on the autism spectrum. The son wears cool colors with geometric patterns to represent his measured way of thinking. The mother wears yellowish green with a moving pattern to represent her churning thoughts of how to best reach her son. The phones are sky blue because I often feel like I am just talking into the air when I try to communicate. All of the piecing of a quilt is like a puzzle, also a symbol for autism.

Daryl Lancaster

Autumn Patchwork Duster
1st Place Award
Hand dyed, Handwoven, Tailored 48” x 18”x 2”, 2018
$2500

The garment silhouette is one of the most fascinating of canvases, the front and back of a garment can never be viewed at the same time, and the inside is always hidden from view
when the garment is worn. I have used the garment as canvas for nearly 50 years. My art training encourages me to occasionally include social commentary and personal themes, but for the most part, I love the engineering and fine skills necessary to make a garment both wearable and beautiful. My garments are a true celebration of the soul of the maker and the wearer. The vehicle for cloth can be the loom, though I don’t limit myself to what I can produce with a series of warps and wefts. I
will employ not only yarn, but the dyepot as well, and in addition, fibers wet felted into a cloth with beautiful organic edges, or those same fibers hand spun and plied into yarns that can be knitted into something celebratory and beautiful.

Daryl Lancaster

Chaos Yardage

Best Use of Dye Award
Hand dyed, Handwoven 144” x 16”, 2016
$600

The garment silhouette is one of the most fascinating of canvases, the front and back of a garment can never be viewed at the same time, and the inside is always hidden from view
when the garment is worn. I have used the garment as canvas for nearly 50 years. My art training encourages me to occasionally include social commentary and personal themes, but for the most part, I love the engineering and fine skills necessary to make a garment both wearable and beautiful. My garments are a true celebration of the soul of the maker and the wearer. The vehicle for cloth can be the loom, though I don’t limit myself to what I can produce with a series of warps and wefts. I
will employ not only yarn, but the dyepot as well, and in addition, fibers wet felted into a cloth with beautiful organic edges, or those same fibers hand spun and plied into yarns that can be knitted into something celebratory and beautiful.

Susan Lenz

In Box CCCXXXI
HGA Award
Fibers 26” x 38”, 2018
$750

Stained glass windows, decorative building motifs, and aerial views of fantasy cities inspire this custom framed, decorative fiber art series. Each piece is a unique, one-of-a-kind creation inspired by the vivid colors and shapes of Austrian Freidensreich Hundertwasser’s eco-friendly buildings and his concepts of individualism. The palette reflects the mood of an urban population at various times of the day and seasons of the year.

Hedy Lyles

Kilim – Silk Scarf
Complex Weavers Award
Handwoven
74” x 8”, 2017
$130

I have worked with fiber and fabric in many forms my entire life and found my niche when I started weaving about 20 years ago. I express myself creating complex designs and I am inspired by colors that are vibrant and alive and found in nature in the world all around us. My original designs are constantly changing as I try to express many subtle differences in weaving structures. My goal is to add beauty to the simple fabric used in the everyday and special occasions of life.

Hedy Lyles

Rephrase – Cotton Towel
Handwoven
29” x 21”, 2017
$75

I have worked with fiber and fabric in many forms my entire life and found my niche when I started weaving about 20 years ago. I express myself creating complex designs and I am inspired by colors that are vibrant and alive and found in nature in the world all around us. My original designs are constantly changing as I try to express many subtle differences in weaving structures. My goal is to add beauty to the simple fabric used in the everyday and special occasions of life.

Malgorzata Oakes

Darkness
Silkscreen on hand pulled Abaca 1.5h beat 14” x 11”, 2019
$550

Inspired by my European upbringing, culture, travels, literature, close contact with nature, I initiate in my work all the values introduced to me as a child. I attempt to include my childhood memories, elements of the past, turning them into new components and experiences. I also address global concerns such as finding a way to cope with emotional trauma; I speak about drastic changes of
the global warming or slowly disappearing trees in local areas that I travel to or reside at. My latest body of work represents a concern about dying trees in the area of New York. My recent cycle of prints “Vanishing Ash” speak for dying ash trees attacked by ash borer that caused nearly 8% of total tree population to disappear. Here I use part of the tree as my matrix creating relief prints overlapping them with additional layers of silkscreen or Mokuhanga while partially printing on a hand-pulled Abaca. My focus is on sustainability while addressing scientific problems in nature.

Frances Parry

Exposure: realizing strength through grief and chaos Student Award
Textile
24” x 20” x 9”, 2017
$1200

Color plays a vital role in my work, as I choose my colors very carefully to embody my concept. I may use a particular shade of green to depict my impression of deception, as the feeling of being deceived reminds me of the underbelly of a snake. Or, I may use a serene palette that reflects the seemingly limited number of colors the viewer may see in an aging barn structure. However, it is the variety of shades, and nuances of subtle color in an aging white barn, with exposed worn wood, and bits of bright green moss growing at its edges, that intrigue me. While the shape and color of the structure pique my interest, how it strengthens or reveals my concept determines how I utilize techniques and specific material colors.

Carole Rossi

Chasing The Blues Away
Art Quilt 30.75” x 24.5”, 2017
$450

My improvisational work is dominated by my highly emotional reaction to color – I can almost smell the colors that I work with. The feelings are that intense! The colors drive the work. Both of the originally designed pieces I am submitting are motivated, in particular, by my reaction to unexpected color combinations. Yellowstone “I,” part of a series, pairs the almost lime greens, teals and rusts found in the hydrothermal hot springs of Yellowstone with unexpected shots of deep purple (reflected in the mud pots) & scratchy grey (reminiscent of the Yellowstone boardwalks); utilizing hand-dyed & commercial cottons, felted wool; heavily quilted with multiple variegated threads; Chasing The Blues Away, also improvisational in design, is driven by color movement, in particular, deep blues & aquas, punctuated by thin white lines, rich rusts and a surprising patch of shimmering deep red rayon at opposite corners of the piece. Again, heavily quilted, mostly with Mettler poly sheen.

Tommy Scanlin

A Year of My Life: 2018
2nd Place Award
Handwoven Tapestry 52” x 11”, 2018
$5000

The natural world of the Southern Appalachians is where I find inspiration. I’m especially drawn to the small things that are sometimes easy to overlook. Things like leaves, stones, and sticks have all have been subjects for tapestries. Three years ago I began to use natural dyes for much of my yarn. Dyeing from nature’s sources seems to be yet another way to honor the vibrancy of life that’s all around us.

Tommy Scanlin

Fall Returns
Handwoven Tapestry 18” x 15”, 2018
$2000

The natural world of the Southern Appalachians is where I find inspiration. I’m especially drawn to the small things that are sometimes easy to overlook. Things like leaves, stones, and sticks have all have been subjects for tapestries. Three years ago I began to use natural dyes for much of my yarn. Dyeing from nature’s sources seems to be yet another way to honor the vibrancy of life that’s all around us.

Pam Shanley

Inner Workings
Fiber 11” x 14”, 2019
$375

I am always looking for color in my immediate world. I seem to always see blues, purples and reds. I joke about my “inner purple.” But this challenge made me think about other colors. What a wonderful change for me and it stretched my use of color!

Teresa Shields

Red Pepper
Embroidery floss, french knots on felted wool 8” x 8” x 1.5”, 2016
$2400

This body of work is inspired by shapes and structures found in nature and the use of color. Color made with embroidery floss by tying thousands of individual french knots, many of them smaller than a poppy seed. My current work might look like a tedious undertaking to most but the truth is I love this work. I’m guided by my intuition and I love working with pattern on pattern, color and texture. The outline, the shape of each object morphs a tiny bit from piece to piece, but what changes are the colors and subtle palette for each piece. Each biomorphic shape and natural object is it’s own tiny world of color. The millions of individually tied knots combined with the repetitive patterns found in nature express a sense of wonder about our world and encourage us to take a slower longer look. Making little pieces of art irresistible to the touch is my goal- and that’s what I can do with fabric and fiber and stitches.

Hannah Shimabukuro

Landscape in Ikat
Handwoven garment 30” x 30” x 6”
$400

Handweaving is a slow, intimate process that may appear calm and calculated. But I do not see my materials as passive. As Tim Ingold writes in his essay The Texility of Making, “material can only be followed.” This philosophy guides me in every project. I am always working with many collaborators. This approach allows me to frame each piece as an experiment in terms of color, pattern, and material. Color is always my main collaborator. I am drawn to putting colors together that you don’t always see, or colors you always see together but using them in striking proportions. My color stories come from memories of growing up in Hawaii; diving with parrot fish, dense foliage, layers of volcanic soil. But this skill has followed me, and I see it here as well; in winter hikes, construction remnants, rainbow colors from oil drips in parking lots. I create work that is visual labor: I put in the time that I want my audience to spend, and I use color to give it a density that requires attention.

Hannah Shimabukuro

Red to Blue Yardage
Handwoven 60” x 36”, 2018
$450

Handweaving is a slow, intimate process that may appear calm and calculated. But I do not see my materials as passive. As Tim Ingold writes in his essay The Texility of Making, “material can only be followed.” This philosophy guides me in every project. I am always working with many collaborators. This approach allows me to frame each piece as an experiment in terms of color, pattern, and material. Color is always my main collaborator. I am drawn to putting colors together that you don’t always see, or colors you always see together but using them in striking proportions. My color stories come from memories of growing up in Hawaii; diving with parrot fish, dense foliage, layers of volcanic soil. But this skill has followed me, and I see it here as well; in winter hikes, construction remnants, rainbow colors from oil drips in parking lots. I create work that is visual labor: I put in the time that I want my audience to spend, and I use color to give it a density that requires attention.

Dianne Totten

Fire in the Night
3rd Place Award
Handwoven 24” x 13”, 2019
$450

I have always enjoyed working with fiber and creating one-of-a-kind pieces. “Fire in the Night,” woven in the crimp technique that I developed several years ago, began with my vision of the finished garment. Color plays a major role in communicating the design idea of this piece. By adding the permanently crimped pattern to the cloth, I was able to incorporate the movement I desired to carry out my “hot” vision.

Naomi Velasquez

Tumbling
Best of Show Made With Cotton Award
Fiber, cotton 36.5” x 35” x 3”, 2017
$3000

Tumbling emerged from a process of creating, deconstructing, and then redefining a new composition to communicate the depth of our complex, multi-faceted lives and ever-evolving relationships. I am intrigued by the way that we constantly adapt to change and are reconfigured by our experiences and influences from the world around us. Our relationships become complex, altered versions that have more layers, depth, and meaning. We may want to cover up experiences or parts of our lives, but remnants of those parts of ourselves are always there, in some manifestation, often peeking out from behind a front we have created. This fiber art piece is a three-dimensional expression of a traditional tumbling blocks quilt pattern. In this piece, I depended upon color theory to ensure that the blocks enhanced each other. I chose hues to make neighboring blocks appear brighter when placed together, much like individuals in relationships who complement one another.

Ashley Weymouth

My BFF
Fulled, felted, needle-felted on recycled wool canvas 21” x 17.5” x 1”, 2018
NFS

Before starting a portrait of an animal, I will know by looking at the photo that is suggested I work from if I will make any sort of connection with the being looking back at me. It is then my goal to have viewers of the artwork make a connection, as well. The vividness of the macaw’s colors really appealed to me and it was important to replicate the fire-engine red hue above his beak because he was being flirtatious and a show-off to the people he came across when I met him. I hope people who see this piece will see what he is exhibiting. The rendition of the Red Heeler was done in soft hues – pinks, light blues and yellows to emit the sweetness of this deaf (and blind in one eye) rescue. The expression on her face is one of guilt because she was doing something naughty but the colors used to replicate her image are meant to relay the impression that she may be naughty but she’s incredibly cute, too.

Kathy Williams

Eucalyptus & Indigo
Fiber – art quilt 31” x 11.25”, 2018
$300

Eco-dying is a relatively new technique for me and I appreciate the simplicity of some of the prints. The design process I utilized with these pieces was by starting with the central panels and designing around them with fabrics and embellishments. I used color to support the design, help set the tone and mood and become part of the message of each piece. Color was definitely used to bring out the subtilty of the prints, but not detract. Differing textures and shapes add subtle tonal elements for interest.

Marianne Williamson

Autumn Colors
Textile 42” x 41”, 2016
$3000

Color is vital to the soul. Fall, with the magic of changing leaves is like a last burst of joy in nature.

Marianne Williamson

Whispered Light
Textile, quilted and painted 40” x 58”, 2018
$4750

Color is vital to the soul. Fall, with the magic of changing leaves is like a last burst of joy in nature.

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